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Royal Wedding Harry and Meghan 19.05.2018

Just married!  Congratulations to Harry & Meghan who are now a married couple

"And my soul is full to brusting, / the dreams dumb not enough anymore: / Must be translated into the songs that moved/ And are those dreams that I write in this book"​

 

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are now married, having just taken their vows at St. George’s Chapel on the grounds of Windsor Castle.

The couple, who are now known as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, said their vows in the presence of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Rt. Hon Justin Welby and a congregation of 600 invited guests. Once it was official, cheers erupted outside the Chapel, to the joy of those inside.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle © The Royal Family UK / official

 

Meghan’s wedding dress, one of the biggest and best-kept secrets throughout the engagement, was designed by the acclaimed British designer, Clare Waight Keller, of Givenchy.

Ms. Waight Keller last year became the first female Artistic Director at the historic French fashion house Givenchy. Earlier this year, the label’s founder, Hubert de Givenchy passed away at the age of 91. The Givenchy label is renowned for its clientele, which has included Audrey Hepburn, Jacqueline Kennedy Onaissis, Princess Grace of Monaco, Elizabeth Taylor, and even Wallis Simpson, the Duchess of Windsor.

After meeting Ms. Waight Keller in early 2018, Meghan chose to work with her for her timeless and elegant aesthetic, impeccable tailoring, and relaxed demeanour. (Photo © The Royal Family UK / official)

 

 

The Wedding Dress: Clare Waight Keller for Givenchy Ms. Meghan Markle’s wedding dress has been designed by the acclaimed British designer, Clare Waight Keller. Ms. Waight Keller last year became the first female Artistic Director at the historic French fashion house Givenchy. After meeting Ms. Waight Keller in early 2018, Ms. Markle chose to work with her for her timeless and elegant aesthetic, impeccable tailoring, and relaxed demeanour. Ms. Markle also wanted to highlight the success of a leading British talent who has now served as the creative head of three globally influential fashion houses – Pringle of Scotland, Chloé, and now Givenchy. Ms. Markle and Ms. Waight Keller worked closely together on the design. The dress epitomises a timeless minimal elegance referencing the codes of the iconic House of Givenchy and showcasing the expert craftsmanship of its world-renowned Parisian couture atelier founded in 1952. (Photo: © The Royal Family UK / official)

 

The Design True to the heritage of the house, the pure lines of the dress are achieved using six meticulously placed seams. The focus of the dress is the graphic open bateau neckline that gracefully frames the shoulders and emphasises the slender sculpted waist. The lines of the dress extend towards the back where the train flows in soft round folds cushioned by an underskirt in triple silk organza. The slim three-quarter sleeves add a note of refined modernity. The Fabric Following extensive research by Ms. Waight Keller in fabric mills throughout Europe, an exclusive double bonded silk cady was developed. Perfect for the round sculptural look required, the silk cady has a soft matt lustre whilst the bonding process and pure white colour chosen by Ms. Markle and Ms. Waight Keller bring a fresh modernity to the dress. The Veil Ms. Markle expressed the wish of having all 53 countries of the Commonwealth with her on her journey through the ceremony. Ms. Waight Keller designed a veil representing the distinctive flora of each Commonwealth country united in one spectacular floral composition. The Commonwealth family of nations – of which Her Majesty The Queen is Head –will be a central part of Prince Harry’s and Ms. Markle’s official work following His Royal Highness’s appointment as Commonwealth Youth Ambassador. Ms. Markle wanted to express her gratitude for the opportunity to support the work of the Commonwealth by incorporating references to its members into the design of her wedding dress. Significant time was spent researching the flora of each Commonwealth country and much care was taken by Ms. Waight Keller to ensure that every flower is unique. (Photo: © The Royal Family UK / official)

 

The veil is five meters long and made from silk tulle with a trim of hand-embroidered flowers in silk threads and organza. Each flower was worked flat, in three dimensions to create a unique and delicate design. The workers spent hundreds of hours meticulously sewing and washing their hands every thirty minutes to keep the tulle and threads pristine. In addition to the flora of the Commonwealth, Ms. Markle also selected two personal favourites: Wintersweet (Chimonanthus praecox), which grows in the grounds of Kensington Palace in front of Nottingham Cottage, and the California Poppy (Eschscholzia californica) the State flower from Ms. Markle’s place of birth, California. Symmetrically placed at the very front of the veil, crops of wheat are delicately embroidered and blend into the flora, to symbolise love and charity. Wedding Shoes The wedding shoes are based on a Givenchy refined pointed couture design made of a silk duchess satin. (Photo: © The Royal Family UK / official)

 

Meghan also wanted to highlight the success of a leading British talent who has now served as the creative head of three globally influential fashion houses – Pringle of Scotland, Chloé, and now Givenchy.

Prince Harry arrived at St. George’s Chapel wearing the frock coat uniform of the Blues and Royals. On his chest, he wore the Pilots’ Wing badge that he received while serving in the Army Air Corps for flying Apache helicopters. He also wore four medal ribbons: K.C.V.O, Afghanistan, The Queen’s Golden Jubilee, and The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee.

Prince William, his best man, was similarly dressed, although with different medals and ribbons denoting his own military service and his status as an Aide-de-Camp to The Queen.

The Queen gave her permission for her grandsons to wear the uniform, and their frockcoats are made of blue doeskin. 

Meghan was accompanied into St. George’s Chapel by her bridal party of six bridesmaids and four pageboys © The Royal Family UK / official

 

Meghan was accompanied into St. George’s Chapel by her bridal party of six bridesmaids and four pageboys. Princess Charlotte of Cambridge, Florence van Cutsem, Remi Litt, Rylan Litt, Ivy Mulroney, and Zalie Warren were the bridesmaids and they wore Givenchy dresses that mimicked Meghan’s dress. The pageboys were Prince George of Cambridge, Jasper Dyer, Brian Mulroney, and John Mulroney; and they wore miniature frockcoats of the Blues and Royals to mimic Prince Harry. (Photo: © The Royal Family UK / official)

 

Lady Jane Fellowes gives a reading from the Song of Solomon 

 

Prince Harry wanted to ensure that his mother, Diana, Princess of Wales’s memory was alive during his wedding ceremony to his American bride, Meghan Markle.

To honour her memory, Harry’s maternal aunt, Lady Jane Fellowes – an older sister to Diana – delivered a short reading during the service today. Lady Jane read from the Song of Solomon from the Nave after the couple had completed the Declaration.

The excerpt from the Song of Solomon by Lady Jane read as follows:

“My beloved speaks and says to me: ‘Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away; for now the winter is past, the rain is over and gone. The flowers appear on the earth; the time of singing has come, and the voice of the turtle-dove is heard in our land. The fig tree puts forth its figs, and the vines are in blossom; they give forth fragrance. Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.’Set me as a seal upon your heart, as a seal upon your arm; for love is strong as death, passion fierce as the grave. Its flashes are flashes of fire, a raging flame. Many waters cannot quench love, neither can floods drown it. If one offered for love all the wealth of one’s house, it would be utterly scorned.”

This is not the only way Harry has chosen to honour his mother. He used two diamonds from her personal collection in the ring he created to give to Meghan when he proposed. Naturally, both his mother’s sisters and her younger brother were in attendance, as were all of his first cousins in the Spencer family.

Lady Jane’s reading was followed by the Choir of St George’s Chapel singing the motet, “If ye love me.” The Address by The Most Reverend Michael Curry was next before the exchanging of the vows. (Photo: © The Royal Family UK / official)

 

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex tour the streets of Windsor in an open topped carriage

 

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have gone on a sun-drenched carriage procession through the streets of Windsor to the delight of the crowds from all over the world who have thronged the streets. The open Ascot-Landau was accompanied by a travelling escort from the Household Cavalry. The route of the carriage procession is lined by various members of all branches of the armed forces, a lot of whom have had a connection with Prince Harry during his ten years in the Army that he says shaped him.

The route-liners included members of the Irish Guards currently stationed in Windsor, members of the Gurkha Rifles, the Army Air Corps and RAF. When the procession came up the spectacular Long Walk, over a kilometre of the barriers was covered with banners that were made especially for the event by school children, from Berkshire together with people from care homes and organised by BBC Radio Berkshire the local radio station. (Photo © The Royal Family UK / official)

 

Estimates of over 120,000 people were packing the area all of them were so delighted to see Their Royal Highnesses waving and smiling to everyone. There was also a nice speed with the carriages compared to the high speed of the Rolls-Royce as it had earlier sped Meghan Markle and her mother up the Long Walk. Hence, all of the crowd got a chance to glimpse of that brilliant dress and the smiling couple who as everyone has said are clearly in love and were clearly showing it all through the journey through both the narrow medieval streets of Windsor and the wide-open space of the Long Walk. It is an astonishing straight road of just over two and a half-miles which took the new Duke and Duchess from the thousands of cheering crowds of the Great Park to the quiet serenity of the Home Park and a chance to reflect on the wedding.